MM fall 2017 exhibition

Fall.2017.poster.1pp

Welcome to the fall exhibition, finally!  I know you're probably more excited about holiday releases at this point, but I still wanted to do a proper fall exhibition, late though it is.  I had originally planned a very different exhibition - a retrospective devoted to an extremely talented and successful makeup artist who has become my obsession over the past few years - but ultimately decided that, much like my failed '90s makeup exhibition, I just couldn't do it the way I envisioned.  I was also concerned that in the unlikely event of "Mother" herself catching wind of it, she might be a bit peeved that I staged an exhibition dedicated to her work in my bedroom, as I think it would be rather insulting to someone of her renown.  I'm not letting go of the concept, of course, but it will have to wait until I can use a proper gallery or museum space for it*.  So in lieu of that, I thought this fall I'd do another exhibition I've been wanting to do for a couple years now.  Every autumn I seem to be more entranced by the magic and mystery of the forest. Perhaps it's my 11 year long status as a city dweller, or my love of woodland critters, but lately I've been loving the idea of relaxing in front of a roaring fire in a beautiful rustic cabin somewhere in the forest...or since I'm not really the outdoors/camping type, maybe a short evening hike in the woods surrounded by moonlight and the sounds of the animals would be more my speed.  In any case, the vibe I was going for was about 20% enchanted, 1% scary (hey, the forest at night can be a little unnerving), but 79% peaceful and calm.

I thought this wonderful illustration by Alexandra Dvornikova perfectly represented the particular forest mood I was trying to capture.  It's even better in its original animated version.

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I'll be doing a follow-up post on why I chose the objects I did, the ones that didn't make it in and some other things that inspired me.  In the meantime, welcome to fall 2017 at the Museum!

(Click to enlarge.)

MM fall 2017 exhibition

MM fall 2017 exhibition

MM fall 2017 exhibition

Top row, left to right.

Revlon Petite compact ad

You would not believe (or be-leaf? haha!) how many vintage compacts I found with leaf patterns.

Revlon Petite compact

Revlon Petite compact

Revlon Petite compact ad

Fall exhibition label

Okay, okay, I KNOW the Moschino seems out of place as it's technically a teddy bear and not one you'd find in the forest.  But a certain little Museum intern begged me to include it, since there are so few bear-shaped makeup items.  The Lamis King lipstick case is the only other one I can think of and that one is definitely more of a wild forest mama bear, what with being perched on a tree stump cuddling her cub.

Sephora x Moschino

Lamis King bear lipstick

Fall 2017 exhibition label

Oils from Shu x OB and Mika Ninagawa collections:

Shu Uemura cleansing oils

Fall 2017 exhibition label

I was positively elated to find not only these two compacts but also the original ad, as it contains the name and date of the design.  I have no idea why that little dude is standing next to it though.  I mean obviously it's part of an article, but it's just...weird.  I'm guessing he was a jockey?

Elgin compacts and ad

Elgin Woodland Fawn compact, ca. 1955

Elgin Woodland Fawn carry-all, ca. 1955

1955 Elgin compact ad

1955 Elgin compact ad

Second row, left to right.

Remember these?

Paul & Joe lipstick cases

Paul & Joe lipstick cases

This little sparrow is actually from the fall 2015 collection and not 2014, which means the label is wrong.  Whoops.

Paul & Joe lipstick cases

Fall 2017 exhibition label

So pleased to come across this compact and in such good condition.  I was determined to find an ad for it and I did!  Not a magazine ad but there was a newspaper one, so I "clipped" it online and printed it out.

Volupte compact, ca. 1942

Volupté compact ad, June 1942

Volupté compact ad, June 1942

Isa x Bambi:

Isa x Bambi

Isa x Bambi

I realize the ad is for a completely different product than the compact, but they're both full of appley goodness.  :)

1952 Lentheric ad

Wadsworth compact, ca. late 1940s/early 50s

Third row, left to right.

I feel like indie companies are really leading the way in terms of creating some new and innovative brush designs.  These flower-filled ones seemed a little spring to me at first, but then I read they're filled with seasonal dried flowers so I figured they were appropriate for fall.  And the deep green of the pouch is very autumnal as well. 

Storybook cosmetics brush set

Storybook cosmetics brush set

Fall 2017 exhibition label

These items were also quite a find!  I literally typed "fox lip balm" into Google and landed on this site, which sells a line called Folklore.  And fortunately they ship to the U.S.  I was also so happy to see this vintage squirrel compact - felt like I just had to buy it since it's the husband's spirit animal.  It's not in quite as good shape as this one, but all the marcasite was still intact so I went for it.

Folklore lip balms and vintage Stratton compact

Folklore lip balm and nail files

Stratton squirrel compact, ca. 1940s

Fall 2017 exhibition label

So sad that the label for this is basically blank, but I still never uncovered any more information about these mysterious Shiseido Chinese zodiac figurines.

Shiseido Year of the Rabbit figurine

Last but not least in this row, the owl shelf.  This one's for my mom since she loves owls.  :)

Owl makeup

The eyeshadow on the left is another piece from Paul & Joe's fall 2015 collection and the highlighting powder is from the holiday 2014 collection. The eyeshadow with the two owls is from fall 2005, and I remember being dismayed that I couldn't find their fall 2005 runway collection anywhere online so I could see if it had the owls.  Then a few years ago I was flipping through an issue of Lucky magazine (I still miss it) and lo and behold, spotted the owls in action - not on clothing but on a pillow in some rich hipster chick's living room.  How serendipitous!  Of course I tore it out and saved it in case I ever exhibited the eyeshadow (and also because I'm a hoarder.)

Owl makeup

Lucky magazine page

Lucky magazine page

Fall 2017 exhibition label

Bottom row, left to right.

Laneige x Lucky Chouette:

Laneige x Lucky Chouette

Laneige x Lucky Chouette

Fall 2017 exhibition label

Chantecaille Save the Forest and Protect the Wolves palettes:

Chantecaille Save the Forest and Protect the Wolves palettes

Chantecaille Save the Forest and Protect the Wolves palettes

Fall 2017 exhibition label

This one is another mystery.  I've seen this shape of Helena Rubinstein compact before and the date was listed as 1962, but have been unable to find it in any ads.  I'm wondering if these were only distributed in countries outside the U.S.  since they're relatively hard to find and don't appear in any American newspapers.  Obviously the Heaven Sent compacts with the angel date sometime after 1941 since that's when the fragrance was released, but this one with the deer on it is strange - I have no idea why it would be connected to the Heaven Sent fragrance.  My hunch is that it's actually related to their Moonlight Mist scent.  Still, the compact's shape and style look way earlier than 1962 or even 1956 when Moonlight Mist was released. 

vintage Helena Rubinstein

vintage Helena Rubinstein deer compact

Speaking of Helena Rubinstein, an exhibition devoted to her just opened at the Jewish Museum in Vienna, so if you're able I highly suggest visiting.  :)

vintage Helena Rubinstein deer compact

Fall 2017 exhibition label

And finally, Stila fall 2006 blush and eyeshadow trios:

Stila fall 2006

And that concludes the fall 2017 exhibition!  Did you feel as though you were deep in an enchanted forest, hearing squirrels romping and leaves crunching under your feet?  I hope so!  And let me know what your favorite item in the exhibition was. :) 

 

*I missed the deadline for MICA's call for proposals for their annual Curator's Incubator show, but I plan on submitting one next year.

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Curator's Corner, 10/15/2017

CC logoEven later than usual, but here are some links.

- I'm starting the Halloween spookiness early by including this roundup of terrifying beauty treatments.  I had heard of some but not all (lard hair pomade, anyone?)

- We might have scoffed and ridiculed the downright dangerous beauty fads of yore, but this photography series points out the absurdity of some of the devices we use today.  At least they're not toxic/deadly...that we know of.

- Silly brow trends continue to dominate the beauty sphere, including brows in the shape of lightning bolts, ponytails and Nike swooshes.  I believe the craziness has now inspired even more facial hair wackiness like these nostril hair extensions

- Despite the glory that is Fenty makeup, there still aren't many foundation shades readily accessible and affordable for women of color.  And don't get me started on yet another shameful Dove ad.  I'm glad the model in the commercial didn't feel victimized, but changing black skin to white skin via soap is a racist advertising technique that literally dates back to the late 1800s.

- Glad someone finally said it.

- Brilliant!

The random:

- There is much '90s nostalgia to be had.  Belly announces a crowdfunding campaign for a new album, a reunion of the ever-hilarious Kids in the Hall might be in store, and L.A. Confidential celebrated its 20th anniversary.  Meanwhile, an article at the Guardian reflects on why the '90s was the best decade for movies.  But I saved the best milestone for last:  Bikini Kill's self-titled debut album was released 25 years ago on October 9.  I didn't know about them or Riot Grrrl back then, but discovering their music years later was life-changing for me.

- I swear I'm completely in sync with Scandinavian home trends.  I was doing hygge long before I even knew the word for it when the trend exploded last year, and for the past couple of years I've been desperately trying to keep the Museum's collection neat and just try to declutter more generally.  This is not because I'm bothered by my crap sitting around but because I don't want anyone to have to deal with it if I get hit by a bus.  It's less of a fear of death and more of a fear of being a burden on people once I'm gone; I'm enough of a nuisance alive, and I figure trying to clear out all my stuff after I'm dead would be even annoying, so I've been forever trying to come up with a firm plan for the Museum's collection (which would be in addition to my will and 5-page accompanying memo - yes, I am a chronic worrier) but also get rid of as much stuff as possible while I can.  Turns out, pre-death tidying is known as "dostadning" (literally "death cleaning").  KonMari never worked for me, so I'm definitely buying the death cleaning book when it comes out in January...if I'm still alive, of course.

- On a less morbid note, I'm hoping to get up to NYC in December to see this new MoMA show.  Even though I haven't seen it, I can tell you that one of the featured items is considered a makeup classic...but I will save how I know that until my exhibition review.  ;)

What's going on with you?  Are you enjoying fall thus far?

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Quick post: freeing the beast with Burberry

Apologies in advance for this short and rather sloppy post on Burberry's latest palette...the Curator is both generally exhausted and busy as a little bee working on more exciting things like the fall exhibition and some truly amazing holiday collections.  This is not to say that Burberry's fall blush is subpar; as a matter of fact, I think it may be the most intricate one they've released to date.  The detail on the leaves is beautiful, but I think my favorite part is that they're raised slightly above the background - it really allows the interplay of matte and shimmer textures to shine.

Burberry fall 2017 blush palette

Burberry fall 2017 blush palette

Burberry fall 2017 blush palette

As with previous seasonal palettes, the print is a reproduction of one that appeared on some of the pieces from the fall 2017 fashion collection.  In particular, the fall palette borrows one of Burberry's "beasts" prints, which were inspired by the fanciful mythical creatures lining the pages of medieval English manuscripts.  This particular print surfaced on much of Burberry's line: womenswear, menswear, accessories and kids' clothes.  (There was another beast print that was used on this lovely beauty box but I skipped it as I didn't think it was that special, plus I need to budget for many holiday items!)

Burberry fall 2017

Burberry fall 2017

Burberry fall 2017

Burberry fall 2017
(images from us.burberry.com)

For the life of me though, I couldn't find an exact match for the pattern on the palette, so I think it may have been modified slightly to fit better.  More specifically, I'm noticing two key differences on the right side of the palette.  It looks like the beast's profile has been erased and replaced with some leaves, and another four-petaled flower has been added in place of his paws/hooves.

Burberry fall 2017 beast print and palette comparison

I also went slightly insane trying to distort the print in Photoshop so that it matched the exact angle of the palette's print.  In the end I couldn't figure it out and gave up before I threw my computer out the window.  I can rotate images just fine but couldn't seem to do any fancy stuff (distort, warp, skew, perspective, etc.)

Burberry fall 2017 beast print and palette comparison

It would have been great if Burberry had kept the print exactly as it was - wouldn't you have liked to see a little medieval beast peeking out from your blush?  I also would have appreciated it if they would have been a little more specific in their references so I could have found the original images.  For example, even though the spring 2017 blush's design wasn't my favorite, I was overjoyed when I found the exact wallpaper print they used, and all they needed to divulge was that the wallpaper was at the V & A.  This time it would have been useful to know the specific medieval manuscripts they were looking at so I could have done some digging.  (I did do a cursory search for medieval manuscript illustrations but didn't see anything strikingly similar).

Anyway, despite these slight missteps this was one of Burberry's prettiest offerings and certainly Museum-worthy.  What do you think?  Oh, and if you crave a daily dose of medieval manuscript illustrations chock full of mythical creatures and other assorted weirdness found in the margins of these tomes, this is the Tumblr for you. ;)


Oh deer! Isa x Bambi

I have no idea how I missed this adorable collection when it was released last fall, but I'm glad I managed to track it down.  Since there are so many Disney collaborations I tend to be fairly selective as to which ones to purchase for the Museum, but I thought this Bambi collection from Korean brand Isa Knox was special enough to be worthy.  :)

Isa Knox Bambi

The outer packaging alone is lovely.  The sides of the boxes have delightful floral prints and Bambi illustrations.

Isa Knox Bambi

Isa Knox Bambi

More pretty floral patterns abound on the compacts themselves, and Bambi's brown fur gets a vibrant, overlapping watercolor makeover.

Isa Knox Bambi

Butterfly!!

Isa Knox Bambi

Isa Knox Bambi

I'm not much of a Disney buff, but I do follow a lot of art blogs, which is how I came across the story of artist Tyrus Wong (1910-2016).   Wong went largely unrecognized for his groundbreaking work on Disney's Bambi until the early aughts, but I'm glad he finally got his due, since his style was instrumental in setting the film's tone and atmosphere and also created an entirely new direction for Disney.  I thought it would be fun to look at the Isa collection within the context of the original Bambi art.

Wong was born in China and came to the U.S. when he was nine (Tyrus is an Americanized version of "Tai Yow" that a teacher assigned him in elementary school).  His father, taking note of his son's interest in drawing, taught him calligraphy every night using a brush dipped in water and "painting" characters on newspapers, as they couldn't afford ink or drawing paper. A junior high teacher noticed Wong's artistic skill and arranged a scholarship for him to attend the Otis College of Art and Design in Los Angeles, where he studied both Western art and the landscape paintings of the Song Dynasty (A.D. 960-1279).  Wong graduated in the early '30s and showed his work in exhibitions throughout the country.  In 1938 he got a job at Disney as an “in-betweener" drawing the thousands of frames that occur in between the main animation sequences.  I didn't know this, but "in-between" animation is incredibly dull and repetitive - it's basically assembly-line production.  When Wong found out Disney would be adapting Felix Salten's 1923 book into a film, he jumped at the opportunity to showcase his work. 

Tyrus Wong

"I said, 'Gee, this is all outdoor scenery...I said, gee, I'm a landscape painter. This will be great!'" Wong recalled in a video used in a 2013 exhibition of his work at San Francisco's Walt Disney Family Museum.  Using pastels and watercolors as well as inspiration from the Song dynasty landscape paintings, Wong sketched out a few samples with emphasis on the play between light and shadow rather than meticulously drawing each leaf and branch.  As you can see, it's more of a pared-down, Impressionist approach that evokes the forest rather than being a literal representation. "I tried to keep it very, very simple and create the atmosphere, the feeling of the forest,” Wong said.  Adds Michael Labrie, director of collections and exhibitions at the Disney Family Museum, "He visualized the forest as being ethereal...the sketches were more of an impression of the forest."

Tyrus Wong - concept art for Bambi

Tyrus Wong - concept art for Bambi

Tyrus Wong - concept art for Bambi

Wong was definitely in the right place at the right time:  Disney realized that the ornate style used for the forest scenes in their 1937 feature Snow White, despite the success of the film, could not be carried over to Bambi.  The highly detailed leaves and trees were overwhelming, basically camouflaging Bambi and the other animals.  Wong's approach not only was perfect for the film's subject matter, but also presented a strikingly different direction for animated films.  “Walt Disney went crazy over them,” notes John Canemaker, who wrote about Wong in his 1996 book. “He said, ‘I love this indefinite quality, the mysterious quality of the forest.’”  Adds chief creative officer for Walt Disney and Pixar Animation Studios John Lasseter, "This sophistication of expression was a gigantic leap forward for the medium."

Tyrus Wong - concept art for Bambi

Tyrus Wong - concept art for Bambi

Tyrus Wong - concept art for Bambi

Tyrus Wong - concept art for Bambi

Tyrus Wong - concepts for Bambi

Tyrus Wong - concepts for Bambi

Here's short video with a few more paintings and commentary both from Wong himself and other people who worked on the film.  (There's another video here but I couldn't figure out how to embed it into this post. Sigh.)

After his time at Disney, Wong produced illustrations for live-action movies at Warner Brothers.  In his later years he continued painting and also branched out into kite-making.  His story is very inspirational, as he was a poor immigrant who worked incredibly hard to overcome not only poverty, but also endured the rampant racism against Chinese people to become an acclaimed artist.

Tyrus Wong(images from cartoonbrew.com and thisiscolossal.com)

Getting back to the Isa collection, I still think it's a solid addition to the Museum (and will look excellent in the fall 2017 exhibition so keep your eyes peeled!), but now a part of me wishes they had used Wong's paintings for the packaging.  As a matter of fact, I'd love to see more companies use original sketches rather than the finished Disney designs.  The only time we've seen the preliminary artwork for a Disney collaboration, at least to my knowledge, is with MAC's Venemous Villains.  

Anyway, what do you think?

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